Canadian Biomass Magazine

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New angle to willow biofuels

Mar. 12, 2015 - Turns out growing willow at an angle will increase its usefulness as a biofuel feedstock. Researchers at Imperial College in London have used medical imaging to study why willows grown at sharp angles improve biofuel yields.


March 12, 2015
By Scott Jamieson


Topics

Using CT scans, they discovered that trees grown on severe angles produce a sugar-rich, gelatinous fibre that helps them stay upright. In a report on phys.org, the researchers note that growing willows at a 45-degree angle can simulate natural conditions producing these effects. Read the full report here.

Imperial researchers have used medical imaging techniques to explore why making willow trees grow at an angle can vastly improve their biofuel yields. Using micro-CT scans, the team showed that the trees respond to being tilted by producing a sugar-rich, gelatinous fibre, which helps them stay upright.

Read more at: phys.org/news/2015-03-ct-scanning-tilting-trees-biofuel.html#jCp

Imperial researchers have used medical imaging techniques to explore why making willow trees grow at an angle can vastly improve their biofuel yields. Using micro-CT scans, the team showed that the trees respond to being tilted by producing a sugar-rich, gelatinous fibre, which helps them stay upright.

Read more at: phys.org/news/2015-03-ct-scanning-tilting-trees-biofuel.html#jCp

Imperial researchers have used medical imaging techniques to explore why making willow trees grow at an angle can vastly improve their biofuel yields. Using micro-CT scans, the team showed that the trees respond to being tilted by producing a sugar-rich, gelatinous fibre, which helps them stay upright.

Read more at: phys.org/news/2015-03-ct-scanning-tilting-trees-biofuel.html#jCp