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PyroGenesis announces product expansion to Europe

December 2, 2013, Montreal, Que. - PyroGenesis Canada Inc., an environmental solutions company that designs, develops and manufactures plasma waste-to-energy systems, announced today that it has reached an agreement to deliver its patented Plasma Waste-to-Energy system to a European company.


December 2, 2013
By Canadian Biomass

December 2, 2013, Montreal, Que. – PyroGenesis
Canada Inc., an environmental solutions company that designs, develops and
manufactures plasma waste-to-energy systems, announced today that it has
reached an agreement to deliver its patented Plasma Waste-to-Energy system to a
European company; secured by a significant non-refundable down-payment. The 10
TPD system is scheduled to be delivered in 2014 where it will be used on a commercial
basis to transform industrial waste into electrical energy and usable
by-products.

"This indeed is a watershed moment for the company,” said
P. Peter Pascali, president and CEO of PyroGenesis. “This sale not only expands
our customer base beyond the traditional US military, but does so in a marketplace
that is in dire need of a reliable, cost-effective and sustainable waste
management solution. “

In 2010, PyroGenesis delivered its first Plasma Waste-to-Energy
System to the U.S. Air Force, which was accepted by the military in 2011. The
system is designed to transform all types of waste (without the need for
pre-sorting) into useful products (electricity and construction material)
without generating any hazardous by-products. 
This capability has particular resonance within the European marketplace
where the options for conventional landfill are limited.

"PyroGenesis' technology has a patented two step
approach which not only makes it a cost effective technology but increases its
reliability and flexibility in handling varying waste feed streams," said
Pascali.

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"Another benefit of our system is that waste is
naturally sorted within the plasma chamber thereby enabling (i) organics to be
transformed into a synthetic gas which is then used to power a gas engine to
produce electricity and (ii) inorganic compounds to form a non-toxic slag that
can be used as a construction material," said Pierre Carabin, director of
engineering for PyroGenesis.

 


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