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Trestle to sell low emissions biofuel in B.C.

November 7, 2014, La Jolla, Calif. - Trestle Energy announced that B.C. has officially approved its process for producing advanced biofuel, clearing the way for Trestle to begin producing and selling its low-emissions biofuel in B.C. With this approval, Trestle Energy is now recognized by B.C. as the lowest emissions ethanol producer in America. 


November 7, 2014
By Canadian Biomass

Topics

November 7, 2014, La Jolla, Calif. – Trestle Energy announced
that B.C. has officially approved its process for producing advanced biofuel,
clearing the way for Trestle to begin producing and selling its low-emissions
biofuel in B.C. With this approval, Trestle Energy is now recognized by B.C. as
the lowest emissions ethanol producer in America. 

 

Trestle Energy will now begin partnering with existing
ethanol plants in Iowa, Minnesota, and across the Midwest to ramp up production
of its low carbon biofuels and make the fuel available to B.C. consumers.
Trestle's method of production will strengthen export markets for American
companies and help them effectively compete with overseas biofuel producers,
while also helping advance important climate and energy security objectives.

 

"We are thrilled that British Columbia has moved
quickly to approve our fuel pathways, so that we can begin to get our advanced
biofuels to market," said James Rhodes, co-founder and president of
Trestle Energy. "We look forward to partnering with ethanol plants to
supply Canada with low carbon biofuels, and we hope to bring them to the United
States as soon as possible so that we can provide Americans with clean,
affordable, low carbon energy."

 

Trestle Energy is hoping to bring the advantages of its
technology to the U.S., and has petitions currently pending with the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)—filed in November 2013—and with the
California Air Resources Board (CARB)—filed in May 2014. EPA put a hold on all
pathway approvals earlier this year while officials conduct an audit of their
internal process, and CARB's application processing has been slowed by its
efforts to re-adopt the state's Low Carbon Fuel Standard. If EPA and CARB
approve the technology, plants across the U.S. could begin ramping up
production immediately. Importantly, this would allow American fuel producers
to compete with the Brazilian fuel market, which is expected to export roughly
$2 billion in sugar cane ethanol to the U.S. annually. In addition, it would
provide President Obama with a big win in his efforts to create new green jobs
and improve the environment by combatting climate change.

 

Trestle Energy's promising and innovative process has
already been lauded by a bipartisan coalition of U.S. Senators, who wrote to
EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy earlier this year urging the Administration to
resume processing fuel pathway petitions and to give Trestle Energy's petition "full
and prompt consideration because of its potential contributions to the
commercialization of advanced biofuels and the associated economic development
in Iowa and other Midwestern states."


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